reblog

UPDATE XI: New LOGOS! Entry and LOGOS! Entries to Date

I’ve decided that new LOGOS! entries, posts on my blog LOGOS! (naturally), which have almost completely been reblogs or external references (transcripts of those references or re-published material) to essays I’ve written, will now appear here in or alongside updates.

Most recently, I recorded a video and uploaded it to YouTube: this video features me reading an essay (“There’s Nothing Special About Meditation“) I’d written and had published in Thelemic Union , as well as re-published in LOGOS!. The essay is entitled “There’s Nothing Special About Meditation,” the re-published essay (as LOGOS! entry) is entitled “LOGOS IV: ‘There’s Nothing Special About Meditation’ (Article Repost),” and the most recent LOGOS! entry (the one in question, and the post featuring the video I mentioned) is titled “LOGOS XII: « “There’s Nothing Special About Meditation” » (Essay-to-Video).” The actual video itself is titled “« “There’s Nothing Special About Meditation” » (2020; essay-to-video) ||| Zen, zazen, Thelema.”

Here’s the video embedded for easier viewing:

In addition to updating this site with new LOGOS! entries, I’d also like to keep a rolling tab on the previous entries on that blog as well, featuring a list of links to them with each LOGOS!-related update. So, below you will find a list of all the posts in LOGOS! so far, from newest to oldest (2021-2018):

REBLOG: “‘Tropic of Cancer’: A Few Excerpts”

An edited reblog-post from early 2015, off the aforementioned “throw-away” blog.

— ES (VSC)

Stuff and Things

NOTE: Updated on February 25, 2016.

Henry Miller (1891-1980) was one of the more unorthodox writers of his time. He’s also something of a personal inspiration to me.

Any half-decent reader is aware of the man… but, then again, who could forget him? He’s known for leading a rather odd, and yet edifying, life, and is also ubiquitous for the development of the modern autobiographical novel.

Arguably his most famous book, Tropic of Cancer (first published in 1934) is one such work. The novel, considered obscene for its candid and humorous expressions of sexuality, was banned in the United States until the 1960s.

The highlights of this book (like many of Miller’s, including Black Spring and Tropic of Capricorn—both recommended) are, however, not Miller’s comedic sexual escapades, but rather his unique brand of non-confessional mysticism—a sort of artistic metaphysics.

Miller was something of a secular prophet, a clownish spiritual guru who taught that the pleasures of life…

View original post 439 more words

REBLOG: “An Inspiring Passage by W. Somerset Maugham”

This is a little thought on a literary quote by Maugham, published last year. (Early 2015.) While I initially wrote it for/on what was a school project, and otherwise a “throw-away” blog, I think that it’s still noteworthy, so I’m reblogging it here.

— ES (VSC)

Stuff and Things

Somerset Maugham’s novel The Moon and Sixpence contains an interesting passage. The following is a reflection on writing by one of the world’s most famous writers:

“It is a salutary discipline to consider the vast number of books that are written, the fair hopes with which their authors see them published, and the fate which awaits them. What chance is there that any book will make its way among that multitude? And the successful books are but the successes of a season. Heaven knows what pains the author has been at, what bitter experiences he has endured and what heartache suffered, to give some chance reader a few hours` relaxation or to while away the tedium of a journey. And if I may judge from the reviews, many of these books are well and carefully written; much thought has gone to their composition; to some even has been given the…

View original post 94 more words